Tag Archives: moteus_r4

CAN bootloader for moteus r4.x

One final piece of porting that needed to happen for the moteus controller r4.x series was the bootloader.  The r3.x series has a bootloader, which allowed re-flashing the device over the normal data link, but that was largely specific to the RS485 and mjlib/multiplex framing format.  Thus, while not particularly challenging, I needed to update it for the FD-CAN interface used on the r4.x board.

The update itself was straightforward: https://github.com/mjbots/moteus/compare/406f01…1123a9

For now, on the assumption I will in the not too distant future deprecate the r3.x series, just duplicated the entire bootloader, replacing all the communication bits with FDCAN and stm32g4 appropriate pieces.  As before, this bootloader is designed to only operate after the normal firmware has initialized the device, and also is required to be completely standalone.  To make code size easier to manage, it makes no calls to any ST HAL library and manipulates everything it needs purely through the register definitions.

Thankfully, the ST HAL sources are BSD licensed, otherwise I’m not sure I could have gotten the FD-CAN and flash peripherals to work just given the reference manual.  With it, copying out the necessary constants made for an easy solution.

 

Moteus controller devkit PCBs in house

Update 2020-01-15: All the development kit slots are full.  Thanks for your interest!

I’ve now received all the supplies I need to make up development kits for the moteus controller and to make a test quadruped!

I’m planning on making a few development kits from this production run so others can experiment with the moteus brushless controllers.  Some people have already expressed interest in getting one — you have hopefully been contacted earlier.  If you are interested in getting an opportunity to buy an early access kit and haven’t heard from me yet, fill out this form!

I expect the development kits to clock in at $199, and include everything you need to power and communicate with the moteus controller, as well as a brushless motor to test with.

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Some fdcanusb boards
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The moteus controller r4.2
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An in-progress moteus development kit
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Lots of moteus controllers!

 

 

Endurance testing moteus controller r4.1

Before ordering a bigger batch of the new moteus r4.1 controller, I wanted some assurance that it would be able to run for an extended periods of time under representative loads while not breaking or having thermal issues.

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r4.1 mounted up

When I did this for the r3.1 controller, I had 2 motor joints and a planar leg built and did a jumping endurance test.  I could have done that now, but building up a leg fixture was more work than I wanted to mess with at the moment, so I went with a simpler approach:

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Getting ready…

I joined two of my fun past-times, robots and juggling!  I printed up an arm with a pocket, stuck a 1lb (450g) juggling ball in it, and set the thing throwing.  Mind you, this is probably one of the worst juggling robots in existence, I only built it to stress test the motor controller.  I’ve had it throwing the ball now for several hours at 4Nm without dropping, here’s a video of some of the testing.

 

 

 

moteus controller r4.1

Another step in my plan for the next revision of the moteus servo mk2, is an updated controller board.  As mentioned in my roadmap, I wanted to revise this board to make improvements in a number of domains:

  • Communications: Now instead of RS485, the primary communications interface is FD-CAN.  This supports data rates of up to 8 Mbit and packet lengths up to 64 bytes.  The header is nominally at the original CAN bit rate, but I have no need to be standards compliant and am running very short busses so I may run everything at the higher rate.
  • Connectors: Now there exist power connectors, in the form of XT30 right angle connectors and they are also daisy chainable like the data connectors.  Additionally, all the connectors exit from the bottom of the board to make routing easier in configurations like the full rotation leg.
  • Controller: This uses the relatively new STM32G4 controller series.  It is lower power than the STM32F4, supports FD-CAN, and also supports closely coupled memory, which may allow me to improve the speed of the primary control loop execution by 3 times.
  • Voltage range: This board now has 40V main FETS, with all other components at 50V rating or higher.  Thus it should be safe with inputs up to 8S (34V or so).
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moteus r4.1 rendering

It still maintains a number of the capabilities of the moteus r3.1 controller:

  • Integrated FOC encoder: An AS5048 encoder is mounted in the center of the back, which allows direct mounting above the rotor for FOC control.
  • Form factor: The entire board is 45x54mm, with M2.5 mounting holes.  It is smaller than a 60mm BLDC motor and much smaller than an 80mm one.
  • Integrated current sensing: It uses a DRV8323 to drive the FETS, which includes current sensing for closed loop current control.

My first attempt at this, “r4”, came back from fabrication in an nonredeemable state.  I used the digikey supplied footprint for the STM32G4 UQFN part, which looked mostly correct on the surface.  However, while the footprint was good, the pinout was for the TQFP variant!  This resulted in me shorting out several power pins to ground right next to the exposed pad in a way I couldn’t easily rework.

r4.1 seems to be in better shape so far.  It powers up, and I now have blinking lights!

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moteus r4.1 as built

Next up is actually porting the control software to the new controller and communications interface.